CMWorld 2015: A Very Brief Summary

CMWORLD 2015

3,500 people. 50 countries. Hundreds of breakout sessions. My experience at Content Marketing World 2015 (CMWorld 2015) was a whirlwind of activity, conversations, and lessons, and it’s hard to distill all that into bite-sized pieces. But I think it’s an important part of processing everything I experienced, so I’m going to give it a shot!

Are you making content, or are you making a difference?

One of my favorite points came from keynote speaker Jay Baer, who asked us: “Are you making content, or are you making a difference?” Jay asked us to consider a little thought experiment he likes to refer to as “The Mom Test.”

Basically, it boils down to this: On the one hand, your mother loves you unconditionally and will generally be proud of anything you do. But on the other hand, she’s probably one of the few people who feels comfortable being unabashedly critical of you. Jay shared a few anecdotes of his awkward dance moves and hamfisted attempt to fix his broken bicycle. His mom straight-up told him that he wasn’t good at those things. But when he was asked to deliver a eulogy for his brother, his mom saw how speaking and sharing his words with others was “his thing.”

Jay urged us to consider whether we are creating content just to check an item off a list or whether we are actually putting something into the world that will be beneficial to others. And this is the concept of “The Mom Test” as applied to content marketing.

Ask yourself what you can stop doing rather than what you should start doing

This came up during several of the sessions that I attended. Many content marketers fall prey to “shiny object syndrome,” geeking out over the latest trend, whether it’s a new(ish) format like podcasting or a novel social media platform (I heard a lot about Blab this year).

But instead of spreading our efforts and attention to an ever-fractured group of pursuits, perhaps we should just focus on doing one or two things and doing them exceedingly well.

Of course this sounds simple enough, but it can be a real challenge, especially in the fast-paced, trend-chasing world we’re living in.

Creativity requires time and space

This idea came courtesy of keynote speaker John Cleese, who provided us with several examples of the characteristics of creative thinkers. People who are genuinely creative make play a significant part of their practice, and they delay making decisions as long as possible.

Cleese gave the example of art school students who were asked to compose a still life. Some students snatched their items from the table and started sketching or painting right away, while others examined their objects for a long time before making their selection. They also seemed to not just look at their subject matter, but to perceive it through all their senses. This lengthy appraisal process eventually led to work that was significantly better and more creative than work from the students who made the snap judgment.

He also recommended a book called Hare Brain Tortoise Mind by Guy Claxton. This book contains further examples of how slow, deliberate thinking facilitates creativity, whereas quick decision-making and analytical thinking is better suited for other types of output.

One of my favorite concepts from Cleese’s talk was the idea of a “tortoise enclosure.” It can be a challenge to do your best slow, deliberate thinking when you’re in an open-plan office, for example. So it’s ideal to have a quiet place where you can go and just be. Allowing yourself a little time in a place like this can do wonders for your creativity. It sounds just dreamy to me!

Customers don’t care about how many followers, likes, etc. you have

This idea came courtesy of keynote speaker Kristina Halvorson. It’s easy to get caught up in these types of numbers, because they’re easy to measure. But when it comes down to whether our content is being truly effective, they have absolutely no bearing on it.

Anyone who is creating content needs to think about how they are helping their customers (or potential customers). A few questions that can help guide you are:

  • What does my customer/potential customer need to do?
  • How can I help?
  • How can I be transparent about how things work in my  company?
  • How can I prioritize my customers over metrics?

So there you have it—just a few of the big ideas that stuck with me during CMWorld 2015. It’s funny because all of these concepts were already familiar to me before I attended the conference. But there’s something about hearing them in a new context, with new examples that makes them seem revelatory and significant.

Did you also attend CMWorld 2015? If so, I’d love to hear some of your key lessons and takeaways.

The Joys of Japanese English (AKA Engrish)

you know…

the door of your heart silently closed…

I, looking at you without a breezing sound…

you know…

my endless wait desiring the door of your heart

would open…

Have I decided to start publishing my poetry on this blog? Nope, not quite. I just thought I’d write a post in honor of Japanese English, or Engrish.

The poem above, which I actually really, really love, came from the front of a photo album I purchased in Japan.

English takes on a life of its own in Japan (and of course this phenomenon is not limited to Japan, but this is where the majority of my experience lies, so I’m sticking to Japanese English for this post). If you’ve never seen it, I’d highly recommend checking out the Engrish.com website for a comprehensive guide to worldwide Engrish.

Before writing too much more, I want to say that my appreciation of Japanese English is not meant to be derogatory or mean-spirited—I genuinely appreciate some of the unexpected humor and beauty that arises when people write in a language that is not their own.

I wanted to share a few examples of Japanese English that I’ve collected throughout the years.

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The text on the packaging reads: “Try our ‘Naive Lady’ toilet tissue soft and of good quality. Choosing recycled paper is the first step to keep the earth full of greens for your own children.”

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“Please defend following when you make the dog stroll in Yoyogi-koen.

  1. Dog owners – for the consideration of others, please ensure that your dog is on a lead while inside the park grounds.
  2. It bears it in mind sanitary in the park ..use… Moreover, please take home to home without throwing it away to the rest room and the garbage box in the park and dispose of Fn.
  3. The park is a public domain place that everyone can use. Let’s bear it in mind so that the use manners are defended, and the trouble should not hang to the other.
  4. Please follow the instruction of the park ranger etc. in the park.”

I believe that Japanese English falls into a few distinct categories, and this is a great example of text that was probably just put into Google translate (or something similar). I love the redundancies “please take home to home” and unusual turns of phrase such as “trouble should not hang to the other.”

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Is it just me, or is there something really funny about an automatic toilet flushing system named “BT-Crab”?

IMG_4066I remember speaking with a fellow English teacher during my first year in Japan and he was wondering if there had been one Japanese/English dictionary that had some bad translations in it, which had then doomed the entire population to make the same mistakes.

One example is the widespread use of the term “woody” where “woodsy” would be more appropriate.

IMG_4075Stay away from the Bigot-mobile!

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“Emargency Exit

If anything should occur, 

please destroy the cover doornob and open the door.”

That seems like an awfully severe reaction to anything that should occur! I also wonder how you can open the door after you’ve destroyed the doorknob.

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Hmm… for some reason I don’t think I want to pay someone to perform any service provided by a company called “Coopoo”…

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First, I have to say that I love the fact that there’s a car called a “Rasheen.”

I’ll end this post with the smaller text on Rasheen’s tire cover:

Listen to the murmuring of a stream.

Run after wild birds. Rest in the bosom of the woods.

Indeed.